Why do Au pairs gain weight in the USA?

Why does an au pair gain weight during her year?

Did you know that during your au pair year, most au pairs will gain an average of 15 to 20 pounds! That is enough for most people to change two sizes bigger. The added sugar and other sweeteners in our American food is one reason for the gain. Au Pair’s also eat more restaurant, take out and drive through foods. These are higher in calorie and fat. Your change in schedule and less time to exercise all combine to make an au pair gain weight. Add that to getting a little older and the scene is set for gaining weight! The good news is you can prevent this and even start a healthy lifestyle that will continue well beyond this one au pair year.

Just 30 minutes of walking, five times a week is enough to improve your overall health from decreasing the symptoms of diabetes and depression to increasing bone density to preventing cancer. And, you will not gain weight!

Walking gives you more muscle tone, which is what we all want for swimsuit season!  One of the easiest ways to help you keep extra weight off and to stimulate an energetic youthful appearance is walking. Not only will you look good but you will help to prevent many diseases. While there’s truth to the saying, if you don’t look good, you don’t feel good, the reverse is also true. Feeling good may be the best way to have that healthy glow.

Did you know that walking can help reduce or prevent diabetes, heart disease, depression–and even some forms of cancer? Everybody has what it takes to stay happy, healthy and strong. You just need your feet and the motivation to get moving. Just taking a few small steps each day can help strengthen your heart and lungs, greatly reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, improve your chances of survival of breast cancer and more.

A University of Duke research team showed the results of an eighth month study. Their findings show that walking thirty minutes per day will help to lose weight! http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/news/7325

walking

The minimum daily requirement of exercise to prevent weight gain is 30 minutes a day of walking, or 12 miles a week of walking or running. A study of sedentary, overweight men and women showed they lost body fat and weight when they walked or ran 12 miles a week during an 8-month study, without changing their diet. A control group of non-exercisers all gained weight and fat during the 8-month study. http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/news/7325

Get Your Minimum Daily Requirement of Walking

“From the perspective of prevention, it appears that the 30 minutes per day will keep most people from gaining the additional weight associated with inactivity,” said Cris Slentz, Ph.D of the Duke University research team in a news release. http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/news/7325

walking get walking

Results

Walking 30 minutes a day or 12 miles a week at 40-55% maximum heart rate: Lost 1% of body weight, lost 1.6% of waist measurement, lost 2% of body fat and gained 0.7% lean muscle.

Jogging at 65-80% of maximum heart rate for 12 miles a week: lost 1% of body weight, lost 1.4% of waist measurement, lost 2.6% of body fat, and gained 1.4% lean muscle.

Jogging at 65-80% of maximum heart rate for 20 miles a week: lost 3.5% of body weight, lost 3.4% of waist measurement, lost 4.9% of body fat, and gained 1.4% lean muscle.

Non-exercise control group: Gained 1.1% weight, gained 0.8% waist measurement, gained 0.5% body fat.

Exercise Without Dieting Reduces Health Risks

The study shows the effects of exercise without dieting in maintaining body weight and reducing risk of major illness. “This study revealed a clear dose-response effect between the amount of exercise and decreases in measurements of central obesity and total body fat mass, reversing the effects seen in the inactive group,” Slentz said. “The close relationship between central body fat and cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension lends further importance to this finding.”

The trial, dubbed STRRIDE (Studies of Targeted Risk Reduction Interventions through Defined Exercise), was led by Duke cardiologist William Kraus, M.D.

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